InformED Report: Educating Out of Poverty

Ugandan school life, special ed evaluating, education awards

01/31/2017 | Uganda | Al Jazeera

Uganda's School for Life: Educating out of Poverty

Al Jazeera

In the 21st century, for many young people "finding a job" is just not an option. And in Uganda, with youth unemployment at around 66 percent, the highest rate in Africa, schools need to tailor their education to meet the different needs of society.

Educate! is an experience-based education model where a mentor goes into a secondary school with 40 "scholars." The mentor spends time with the scholars, delivering sessions on entrepreneurship, leadership, critical thinking and problem-solving.

The pedagogy enables the use of games, group work and encourages public speaking. The scholars are encouraged to set up businesses, which are open to everyone in the school. They are also encouraged to be responsive to the needs of their local communities.

"Uganda has such a huge young demographic. Over 70 percent of the population is actually young people under the age of 30, and the challenge that we are having is that there is a mismatch between the number of students that graduate from school, and the available jobs in the market," Emmanuel Kalyebi, the programme coordinator of Educate!, says.

To read more visit Al Jazeera

01/24/2017 | Denver, CO | The Atlantic

Is the Bar Too Low for Special Education?

Laura McKenna | The Atlantic | Twitter

In fourth grade, Drew’s behavioral problems in school grew worse. Gripped by extreme fears of flies, spills, and public restrooms, Drew began banging his head, removing his clothing, running out of the school building, and urinating on the floor. These behaviors, which stemmed from autism and ADHD, meant that Drew was regularly removed from the classroom in his suburban school outside of Denver and only made a marginal academic improvement, according to court documents.

Alarmed by their son’s increasingly difficult behaviors, his parents placed him in a private school that specializes in autistic children like Drew. The new school controlled Drew’s behaviors using ABA therapy—a standard, but intensive, treatment for autistic children with behavioral problems that were not offered at his public school. Now age 17, Drew has made “significant” progress academically and socially at his new school.

To read more visit The Atlantic

Special Education Enrollment Rose in 2015-16

Christina A. Samuels | Education Week | Twitter

The number of students ages 6 to 21 enrolled in special education rose in the most recent year for which the federal government has data, driven by increases in the number of students classified as having autism or "other health impairments." It was the fourth year in a row for such an increase.

In fall 2015, about 5.9 million students enrolled in the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Bureau of Indian Education Schools received services through the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. A year ago, enrollment in that age group was approximately 5.8 million. The peak enrollment for special education was 6 million in fall 2004.

The proportion of special education students in the 6-to-21 age range is also going up. In fall 2015, students with disabilities made up about 8.8 percent of the overall population of U.S. residents those ages as calculated by the U.S. Census Bureau. In fall 2014, that proportion was 8.7 percent.

To read more visit Education Week

02/01/2017 | West Michigan | WWMT

Catalyst Education Awards: Teachers

Christine Van Timmeren | WWMT.com | Twitter

Teachers in West Michigan are doing amazing things in the classroom, using state of the art technology and good old-fashioned relationship building.

Today Newschannel 3 is highlighting the teachers awarded at the Catalyst University Event.

Teachers in West Michigan are first class, encouraging all students to work hard not only on academics but on becoming good people as well.

Niles High School Band Director Josh Doe has doubled the size of the band in just four years.

To read more visit WWMT

Comments
No Comments

Leave A Comment